July 2017 Reading Recap – My Month in Reading

My July 2017 reading recap has to start with how this crazy month both ate into my reading practice and made me love reading again. At the end of June, I started a new job that had very specific and brutal hours that ultimately I could not adjust to since I am so sensitive to losing sleep. But there were a few weeks there where I was working about 20 hours there and still had all my regular freelance work, so it was 15 hour days for enough days to wear me down. Anyway, I decided to pursue other opportunities, and now reading (and writing) have come back into my life. When that happens, an intense crush of reading deprivation, it makes me love reading even more, crave it even more. Which is a good thing because for those days when I was chained to my MacBook for 13 hours straight, I sought out the quiet peace of a book rather than watch TV. Can I just say, it is so nice to unplug and read? Even though I have been reading on my Kindle more, there is a beauty to shutting down your computer, turning off your phone, and just losing...

Book Review of “A Study in Charlotte”

In today’s post we look at a book review of , Brittany Cavallaro’s promising debut YA mystery and the first in a trilogy. Recently I updated some things on Goodreads—finished a book, marked it Read, checked out my “2016” shelf to see how many books were on it—and learned something surprising about myself. I discovered that my average rating had dropped to 3.58. So out of 227 books I’ve marked as “Read” since October 2010, four have no star rating because they did not earn even one star, and the remaining 223 were rated a 3.58 on average. Damn. When did I becomes so critical? Probably 2014, the year my read-per-year number jumped to 53 books, up from 22 in 2013 and 15 in 2012. My relationship to reading has changed as the years have passed. When I graduated college in 2011, I was grateful to read just about any book. Similarly, I went through a few years of holding jobs that were less than intellectually stimulating, so I erred on the side of anything I read and remotely liked as a five star or four star read due to pure escapism. But since I started reviewing and writing about books...

“Beastly Bones: A Jackaby Novel” by William Ritter | Book Review

(First thank you to the publisher, Algonquin, for providing me with an advanced review copy. This did not in any way affect my review.) In Short: Beastly Bones, Ritter’s follow-up to 2014’s Jackaby is a lively, action-packed, and entertaining mystery-paranormal novel that will find many fans of all ages  who love Sherlock, Doctor Who, Supernatural, and Harry Potter. Plot Summary: The year is 1892, and the place is the New England city of New Fiddleham. Abigail Rook, a young British woman, has been living with her employer, the eccentric R. F. Jackaby, a detective of the paranormal. Abigail acts as Jackaby’s assistant, helping with paperwork and, increasingly, the investigative and deductive process. When the novel opens, Rook and Jackaby are called to the scene of a lady who has purchased shapeshifting cats. Later, the duo learn from assistant police commissioner Marlowe that this woman has been found dead with an unusual puncture mark on her neck similar to one found on a woman who has just died in the nearby village of Gad’s Valley in the countryside. Jackaby and Rook go there to join up with a former member of the police force, Charlie Cane (a werewolf love interest of Abigail’s), who has recently been exiled to...

Jackaby by William Ritter | Review

Ritter, William. Jackaby. New York: Algonquin Young Readers, 2014. Genre: Mystery, Historical Fiction Intended Audience: 12 and up Personal reaction to the book… Jackaby has been heavily branded as “Doctor Who meets Sherlock,” by the publisher and by reviewers, and to some extent it lives up to that tag line. I have not seen many episodes of Doctor Who but I can definitely see the Sherlock elements. In the author picture at the back, Ritter is very obviously imitating the BBC Holmes with the expensive coat and scarf. Surprisingly enough, I did not mind that, even though Sherlock is one of my favorite shows.

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“We Were Liars” by E. Lockhart | Book Review

Lockhart, E. We Were Liars. New York: Delacourte, 2014. Genre: Contemporary, Mystery, Psychological Thriller Intended Audience: 14 and up Personal reaction to the book In Lockhart’s We Were Liars, the main character and narrator, Cadence Sinclair, has experienced a mysterious “accident” that has left her with crippling headaches, vomiting, and memory issues. This accident took place during “Summer 15,” or the summer of her fifteenth year which she spent on a private island off the coast of Massachusetts with her cousins and their friend “Gat.” Cady, her cousins, and Gat form a group called the Liars. After her accident on summer 15, Cady is not allowed to go back for summer 16 and returns on summer 17. Nobody will give her a clear idea of how her accident took place, and this forms the central mystery of the novel: will she remember what happened?

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Greetings Fellow Reader!

Welcome to Broke By Books, a blog by Sarah S. Davis, where the guiding mission is to spread a contagious love for reading through helpful, thought provoking, and enjoyable writing about books. Please join me in growing an inspired, engaged, and fearless reading life.

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